DIFFERENT STRING TYPES EXPLAINED


Monofilament
  • Comprise of single solid material
  • Long lasting
  • Recent developments have introduced softer feel with more response
  • Some strings are non-circular to give so-called 'corners' on the string with the aim of helping with spin
  • Often used on mains with softer strings on crosses to give good mix durability and playability
  • Chronic string breakers often resort to monofilaments in both mains and crosses
  • Not recommended if any arm problems develop. Monofilaments transfer more shock down the racket into the handle.
Multifilament
  • no centre core
  • consist of hundreds of strands of material twisted together
  • are the closest to natural gut and offer the best comfort to people suffering from tennis elbow or other arm problems
  • offer great playability and shock absorption
  • lose tension faster - need to be replaced more frequently
  • often tend to be more expensive than monfilaments, but a cheaper alternative to natural gut.

Core with Single Wrap

  •  thin monofilament core with a single layer of fibres twisted around the outside
  • used in many of the budget nylon strings
  • The centre, solid core, gives the string durability, whilst the single wrap outer gives the string more playability than a standard monofilament.
Solid Core with Double Wrap
  • monofilament core with a two layers of fibres twisted around the outside, usually wound in different directions, usually coated for protection
  • the centre, solid core, gives the string durability although thinner than the single wrapped version. 
  • two wraps give the string more playability than either a monofilament or a single wrapped string.
Hybrid
  • two different types of string - one for the main strings and one for the cross strings
  • most common set up is a monofilament string in the mains and a softer, often multifilament string in the crosses
  • good for performance players
Natural Gut
  • more expensive, but still the best string on the market
  • poor weather conditions can reduce the life of a gut string.
Textured
  • designed to give more bite to the ball 
  • tend to have a solid core with a number of uniform wraps - another wrap wound around the outside to give a rough feel to the string
  • textured strings often used in a hybrid set up to compensate for the smooth surface of the monofilament